Interlaken Group Guidance Tool for Companies Committed to the Voluntary Guidelines on Responsible Governance of Tenure – Jeffrey Hatcher, Indufor North America

This presentation was given by Indufor North America’s Jeffrey Hatcher at a session titled “Interlaken Group Guidance Tool for Companies Committed to the Voluntary Guidelines on Responsible Governance of Tenure” at the Global Landscapes Forum: The Investment Case on June 10, 2015.

Seeing the big picture of land restoration

Presentation by Deborah Bossio at “Putting pledges into practice in Latin America – an early assessment of Initiative 20×20 from science, policy and finance perspectives”
Discussion Forum on the second day of the Global Landscapes Forum 2015, in Paris, France alongside COP21. For more information go to: www.landscapes.org.

Walter Vergara at “Putting pledges into practice in Latin America”

Presentation by Walter Vergara at “Putting pledges into practice in Latin America – an early assessment of Initiative 20×20 from science, policy and finance perspectives” Discussion Forum on the second day of the Global Landscapes Forum 2015, in Paris, France alongside COP21. For more information go to: www.landscapes.org.

The Peru Cocoa Alliance: 28,000ha of fine and flavor cocoa under Agroforestry Systems Experiences

Presentation by Jose Iturrios at “Putting pledges into practice in Latin America – an early assessment of Initiative 20×20 from science, policy and finance perspectives” Discussion Forum on the second day of the Global Landscapes Forum 2015, in Paris, France alongside COP21. For more information go to: www.landscapes.org.

Infographic: Land Management in Central Mexico – Why do we need Landscape Approaches to land management

Reference: Madrid, L., & Deschamps, P. (2014). The role of local communities in achieving sustainable rural landscape management. Lessons from Central Mexico. European Tropical Forest Research Network, (56).

Decentralisation and devolution in Nicaragua’s North Atlantic Autonomous Region: Natural resources and indigenous peoples’ rights

A number of governments, particularly in Latin America, have begun to recognise the rights of indigenous peoples and traditional communities to the lands on which they live. Recognition has often taken the form of constitutional provisions or laws that grant use rights in perpetuity or provide land titles. These provisions usually establish rights for multiple communities over a large territory, at a scale that may be ideal for promoting broader, ecosystem management approaches. At the same time, however, indigenous communities often do not have existing territorial governance structures at these scales. Nicaragua’s North Atlantic Autonomous Region provides a rich setting in which to study issues of multilevel natural resource governance. In addition to the devolution policies that have created official indigenous territories, the central government has decentralised important powers over natural resources to the regional autonomous authority, while municipal authorities still exist but it is unclear what their role will be in the future. At the same time, however, the community scale is the one at which local people have traditionally managed resources. This paper examines these issues in light of efforts to establish democratic governance institutions at the territory level and argues that communities continue to lose out under multilevel governance regimes without concerted efforts to level the playing field. The findings are based on several years of research in the region, emerging research on newly titled territories and a six month training and dialogue with territory leaders, organised by a consortium of international and local NGOs.

The Dynamic forest commons of Central America: new directions for research

This article reviews research on forests in Central America under the lens of common pool resources literature. It briefly presents research in the region and highlights some limitations of the majority of common property scholarship. The article draws on three case studies in Guatemala and Nicaragua that were part of a study on forest tenure reforms in 2006–2009 to demonstrate the need to expand beyond the traditional questions and methods of common property research. It argues that greater attention must be given to the dynamic, historical processes that produce boundaries and institutions, rather than accepting these as givens.