How can art and science come together to fight global warming?

04 Jun 2022

GLF Live for World Environment Day with Abhiyant Tiwari and Alexandra Kleeman

 

In the last decades, climate change has inspired artists to create works that convey scientific information about the issue. Art’s capacity of changing people’s opinions, through conveying the right message is hopeful and gives people ideas for change. Science and art can help inspire change.

Through inspiring, funny, and satiric literature, visionary writer Alexandra Kleeman makes us reflect on the ecological reality we face by using art to spread the word about our changing climate.

Anhyant Tiwari uses technology solutions to develop risk-informed heat health warning systems in India.

In this Live for the World Environment Day 2022, we bring together Abhiyant Tiwari, and Alexandra Kleeman to discuss the interplay of art and science in holding our global future.

 

About the speakers: climate art

 

Alexandra Kleeman is the author of the novel Something New Under the Sun, a sharpy climate tale full of satirical reflections about climate reality. Her work also includes Intimations, and You Too Can Have A Body Like Mine, which was awarded the 2016 Bard Fiction Prize and New York Times Editor’s Choice.

In 2020, she was awarded the Rome Prize and the Berlin Prize as well as Guggenheim Fellowship in Fiction in 2022.

Abhiyant Tiwari is an Indian heat health expert. He holds a master’s in public health specializing in environmental health sciences from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Since 2013, as a public health researcher and practitioner at the Public Health Foundation of India, Tiwari has worked with partners including the Natural Resources Defense Council, the U.S., and national and sub-national government agencies on developing, implementing, and scaling heatwave health adaptation plans in India.

He also led a preliminary study for the National Disaster Management of India to estimate local temperature thresholds for heatwave warning systems in more than 100 Indian cities and works on developing risk-informed heat health warning systems.