The State of the World’s Forests: Forests, Biodiversity and People

The State of the World’s Forests: Forests, Biodiversity and People

The vast majority of terrestrial biodiversity is found in the world’s forests – from boreal forests in the far North to tropical rainforests. Together, they contain more than 60 000 different tree species and provide habitats for 80 percent of amphibian species, 75 percent of bird species and 68 percent of mammal species. About 60 percent of all vascular plants are found in tropical forests. Mangroves provide breeding grounds and nurseries for numerous species of fish and shellfish and help trap sediments that might otherwise adversely affect seagrass beds and coral reefs, habitats for marine life.

The conservation of the majority of the world’s biodiversity is thus utterly dependent on the way in which we interact with and use the world’s forests. This edition of SOFO examines the contributions of forests, and of the people who use and manage them, to the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity. It assesses progress to date in meeting global targets and goals relating to forest biodiversity and describes the effectiveness of policies, actions and approaches for conservation and sustainable development alike, illustrated by case studies of innovative practices and win-win solutions.

Author: UN Environment Programme (UNEP), Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

Publisher: UN Environment Programme (UNEP), Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

Language: English, Arabic, Chinese, Russian, Spanish

Year: 2020

Keyword(s): biodiversity, biodiversity loss, forests, habitats, restoration, UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration

Ecosystem(s): Forests