The White/Wiphala Paper on Indigenous Peoples’ Food Systems

The White/Wiphala Paper on Indigenous Peoples’ Food Systems

The global food system is unsustainable. Unmitigated, our current food systems will result in radically modified ecosystems, environments, coastlines, mountain tops, glaciers, water bodies and weather patterns, with consequences for human wellbeing and life on earth. More efficient, sustainable, resilient and equitable food systems are needed if we are to eliminate hunger and achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. The 2021 United Nations Food Systems Summit is a call for the review of the ways that food is produced, processed and consumed across the world – and summoning of solutions to transform current food systems to increase their sustainability, resilience and efficiency.

Indigenous Peoples’ food systems are well placed to contribute to global debates around food whilst priority should remain focussed on protecting and strengthening their food systems. Indigenous Peoples must be considered key allies in efforts to achieve the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals for Zero Hunger, and develop more sustainable, resilient and equitable food systems post-2030.

This paper articulates the lessons that can be learned from Indigenous Peoples and advocates for their inclusion on the agenda of the 2021 United Nations Food Systems Summit.

Author: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

Publisher: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

Language: English

Year: 2021

Keyword(s): agriculture, agrobiodiversity, food, food systems, gender, Indigenous peoples, Indigenous peoples and local communities (IPLCs), livelihoods, rights, sustainable agriculture, sustainable production, traditional knowledge, UN Food Systems Summit, zero hunger

Ecosystem(s): Wetlands and Peatlands, Forests, Agricultural Land, Oceans and Coasts, Mountains, Drylands and Rangelands

Location(s): Global